Last edited by Mautaxe
Saturday, February 1, 2020 | History

8 edition of On the Nature of the Universe found in the catalog.

On the Nature of the Universe

  • 225 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Didactic poetry, Latin -- Translations into English,
  • Philosophy, Ancient -- Poetry

  • Edition Notes

    StatementLucretius ; translated by Ronald Melville ; with an introduction and notes by Don and Peta Fowler.
    SeriesOxford world"s classics
    ContributionsMelville, Ronald, Sir., Fowler, Don, 1953-1999., Fowler, Peta.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA6483.E5 M45 1999
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Paginationp. cm.
    Number of Pages320
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL374192M
    ISBN 100192817612
    LC Control Number98035967

    Thou shalt not speed in undertakings more, Nor be the warder of thine own no more. But death precludeth this, Forbidding life to him on whom might crowd Such irk and care; and granted 'tis to know: Nothing for us there is to dread in death, No wretchedness for him who is no more, The same estate as if ne'er born before, When death immortal hath ta'en the mortal life. Everywhere lies open to things, infinite in every direction on every side It is interesting that he leaves with such a gloomy subject but then again fitting for death is the destination for all of us and a fear of death foolish to the true Epicurean. These, then, are Lucretius' basic principles, and not just of physics, but of argument: he tells us before he begins his arguments that the thing that will shake out the fear and shadows of our minds will be the external appearance and underlying explanation of nature naturae species ratioqueand that is what he uses: familiar sights from our everyday life, or ridiculous counter-factual situations presented as the logical consequence of failing to accept his principles. And whilst, from these, men wish to scape afar, Driven by false terror, and afar remove, With civic blood a fortune they amass, They double their riches, greedy, heapers-up Of corpse on corpse they have a cruel laugh For the sad burial of a brother-born, And hatred and fear of tables of their kin.

    Lucretius bases his argument on the atomic theory expounded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus. A culture defines the way individuals think by grouping likeminded individuals for the sake of society. Most of his writings have perished, particularly On Nature. The example we are given is a beautiful picture of the sky as father raining on mother earth, and that union leading to the world we see around us.

    The particles of matter atoms are colorless and devoid of sensation, but the compounds derived from them can impart sensation. You can get some information about science from the Wikipedia article and hundreds of thousands of other sources, including this transcript of one of Feynman's talkswhich closes with the money line: Science alone of all the subjects contains within itself the lesson of the danger of belief in the infallibility of the greatest teachers of the preceding generation. Yet should one complain, Riper in years and elder, and lament, Poor devil, his death more sorely than is fit, Then would she not, with greater right, on him Cry out, inveighing with a voice more shrill: "Off with thy tears, and choke thy whines, buffoon! And thence mayst see That, as conjoined is their source of weal, Conjoined also must their nature be. Without it, there would be no motion, because there would be no space without particles in it into which particles could move, and a ball of wool would weigh the same as a ball of lead.


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On the Nature of the Universe book

He appeals to the familiarities of the surrounding world: there are plenty of things we can't see but nevertheless know exist, such as wind and smells; even our drying laundry is proof that invisible particles exist — we can't see the particles of moisture being drawn out, but we can clearly see that they are.

Just so, when vanished the bouquet of wine, Or when an unguent's perfume delicate Into the winds away departs, or when From any body savour's gone, yet still The thing itself seems minished naught to eyes, Thereby, nor aught abstracted from its weight- No marvel, because seeds many and minute Produce the savours and the redolence In the whole body of the things.

As for the primary elements, no force has power to extinguish them But public fact declares against all this: For soul is so entwined through the veins, The flesh, the thews, the bones, that even the teeth Share in sensation, as proven by dull ache, By twinge from icy water, or grating crunch Upon a stone that got in mouth with bread.

Even when deprived of all but all the soul, Yet will it linger on and cleave to life,- Just as the power of vision still is strong, If but the pupil shall abide unharmed, Even when the eye around it's sorely rent- Provided only thou destroyest not Wholly the ball, but, cutting round the pupil, Leavest that pupil by itself behind- For more would ruin sight.

So be merry all, for death is final. The origin of language, of fire, monarchies. Wherefore 'tis sure that what hath been before Hath died, and what now is is now create. Yet fancy not its nature simple so. Science has built into it organized skepticism that comes from a preference for theories that can in principle be falsified through repeated experimentation.

We may be sure They'll take their refuge in the thought that mind Becomes a weakling in a weakling frame.

Wonders Universe or Curiosities Nature Art

Culture is defined as a shared belief, values, and behaviors amongst other individuals. Challenging us to find that boundary leads to one of Lucretius' most inspired images: he takes the historic Roman declaration of war — the hurling of a spear into enemy territory — and asks us to re-enact it at the alleged edge of the universe.

Hearing, speech, sounds, taste, smell. All things are composed of imperishable seeds Yet not at all do those primordial germs Roam round our members, at that time, afar From their own motions that produce our senses- Since, when he's startled from his sleep, a man Collects his senses.

Look back: Nothing to us was all fore-passed eld Of time the eternal, ere we had a birth. But, again, where cause Of that disease has faced about, and back Retreats sharp poison of corrupted frame Into its shadowy lairs, the man at first Arises reeling, and gradually comes back To all his senses and recovers soul.

Often the body palpable and seen Sickens, while yet in some invisible part We feel a pleasure; oft the other way, A miserable in mind feels pleasure still Throughout his body- quite the same as when A foot may pain without a pain in head. Lucretius regarded him as the spiritual savior of mankind.

Some atoms also come from the ether and from space. This may be my favourite book, for it is as imaginative as it is logical. And Scipio's son, the thunderbolt of war, Horror of Carthage, gave his bones to earth, Like to the lowliest villein in the house.

This also shows the nature of the same, How nice its texture, in how small a space 'Twould go, if once compacted as a pellet: When death's unvexed repose gets hold on man And mind and soul retire, thou markest there From the whole body nothing ta'en in form, Nothing in weight.

Exercise: Research historical examples of religious institutions both supporting and suppressing scientific inquiry. The number of atomic shapes is limited, though the atoms of each shape are infinite in number. Add, too, that frenzy, peculiar to the mind, And that oblivion of the things that were; Add its submergence in the murky waves Of drowse and torpor.

Some ideas from Alain de Botton: Mysticism "Mysticism" is another term that's hard to define. For an impalpable aura, mixed with heat, Deserts the dying, and heat draws off the air; And heat there's none, unless commixed with air: For, since the nature of all heat is rare, Athrough it many seeds of air must move.

Mind and soul consist of material substance The components of the world-- earth, sea, sky-- are destined to be destroyed.

Lovers are in love deluded by Venus with images: no matter how intently they gaze at the beloved body, they cannot sate their eyes; nor can they remove anything from the velvety limbs which they explore with roving, uncertain handsDe rerum natura (Latin: [deː ˈreːrũː naːˈtuːraː]; On the Nature of Things) is a first-century BC didactic poem by the Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius (c.

99 BC – c. 55 BC) with the goal of explaining Epicurean philosophy to a Roman audience. The poem, written in some 7, dactylic hexameters, is divided into six untitled books, and explores Epicurean physics through poetic Country: Roman Republic.

Jun 18,  · A Universe from Nothing is a New York Time best-seller and the book stays true to the title looking at why and how the universe began from “nothing.” The book aims to be physics’ answer to philosophy’s questions and maybe after reading it you might, like Stephen Hawking, conclude that philosophy is dead at the hand of physics.

Book I Summary Lucretius begins his poem with a prayer to Venus, the Roman goddess of love, whose reproductive powers allow everything in nature to flourish. He asks her to bring charm to his words that will help them to endure. Lucretius also tells us in this prayer that he is writing this work for [ ].

Book Review: ‘The Dialogues: Conversations about the Nature of the Universe’ Perhaps it's time we start having conversations about science once again -- and this book is a great place to start. Sep 15,  · What Is the Universe? Real Physics Has Some Mind-Bending Answers Science says the universe could be a hologram, a computer program, a black hole or Author: Victoria Jaggard.

Beliefs of the Nature of the Universe Change with Cultural Diversity

Jan 10,  · Is the Universe Made of Math? [Excerpt] In this excerpt from his new book, Our Mathematical Universe, M.I.T. professor Max Tegmark explores Author: Max Tegmark.